Friday, June 26, 2015

Finding your niche

We're more than simple dominoes...
I’ve been reading a book recently about how nature is adapting to climate change. It’s much more positive than the doom and gloom messages we see in the global press.

Funnily enough our global flora and fauna are far more resilient than we might imagine, and while it’s still important for us to reduce our polluting and damaging activities, our natural environments are likely to recover much more quickly than some predict.

The book reminded me that our ecosystems aren’t static and closed systems but open, adaptable and collaborative.
"Our ecosystems are open, adaptable and collaborative"
It's a misconception that each animal or plant only has a single vital role to play, each with its own unique niche, and all stacked up like a fragile row of dominoes. The reality is that different species collectively tend to perform niche functions within an ecosystem - functions like providing specific habitat, pollinating flowers or dispersing seeds.

Happily, plenty of different species are surprisingly resilient to a changing climate. Yes there are niches, but they're big enough for a number of species!

I was a big fan of Roald Dahl books when I was growing up. To be honest I still am and I'm looking forward to introducing them to my kids when they're old enough. I'm sure that many of you will be familiar with Charlie and The Chocolate Factory. In the story Charlie finds a winning golden ticket in a chocolate bar which leads him into adventures beyond his wildest dreams. I do wonder whether we have times in our lives where we feel that finding our place, our calling, our niche is like searching for that golden ticket. Maybe we'll find it, more likely we won't, but at least we'll have a nice chocolate bar to eat anyway!
"Different species collectively tend to perform niche functions within an ecosystem"
The "golden ticket" mindset that we've only got a narrow niche to fill in life, that we're a single domino to be placed in line, can be restrictive and discouraging. Of course there's no harm in searching for that golden ticket, but maybe there isn't just one ticket to be found. Like the broad ecological niches, our lives are best thought of as a broad portfolio, richer and more nuanced than being a single domino with a single position. As Jeff Goins might say, we can be a jack of all trades and master of some.

Still looking for the golden ticket??
That doesn't make it any easier to find our place in the world, but it does mean that you don't need to panic if you don't feel you've found your purpose yet.

Thinking in ecosystem terms, one thing about niches is that they don't exist in isolation - they can only function as part of something bigger, and they tend to be something to grow into.

When I studied Civil Engineering I didn't have a fixed idea in my mind of what I'd end up doing with it.

I figured that was a sensible vocational degree to study, especially in the absence of any other good ideas! Thinking back I picked it because it was the broadest engineering discipline and so it left my options open.
"The Golden Ticket mindset that we've only got a narrow niche to fill in life can be restrictive and discouraging."
Fast forward over thirteen years and I've found myself to be a specialist generalist - by which I mean I have broad skills in lots of areas but have ended up pretty specialist in the area of water and flood risk. I must say that this wasn't an intentional niche to fill, but as I've been part of a diverse organisation I've learnt lots of skills, undertaken lots of projects and found myself especially adept in one area above others. But it's a wide niche, accommodating others, and it's not exclusive - I can cover lots of other bases too. It's good to be adaptable!

In my working life this is a niche I happen to be filling at the moment, but it's unlikely to always be the case. Change is inevitable, and thinking in portfolio terms helps us to consider other niches we could fill. If you've never read Who Moved My Cheese? it's a fantastic little parable about dealing with change in our lives, especially in our working lives.

So don't worry if you don't feel like you've found your niche yet, if you're still searching for your golden ticket. The main thing is to be a part of a wider ecosystem, to be connected to something bigger, and see what grows - maybe there's a dozen silver tickets to find instead!

Likewise, if you're happily in your niche, don't get complacent - change is happening faster than you may think! So stay open-minded, grateful and aware of your environment. Your next niche may be closer than you know...
"Change is inevitable, and thinking in portfolio terms helps us to consider other niches we could fill."
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Thanks for taking the time to read Finding Your Niche. If you've enjoyed it please share it with your friends on social media! Why not subscribe to The Potting Shed Podcast on iTunes for the audio version and much more (direct RSS feed is here).

I'd love to hear from you, so feel free to comment below or email me at stricklandmusings@gmail.com 

If you want to stay up to date please sign up to my mailing list, and do check out my book Life Space on Amazon.

Friday, June 19, 2015

Interview with Cathy Madavan

I recently had a fantastic interview with Cathy Madavan, author of the book Digging for Diamonds, for The Potting Shed Podcast. If you haven't caught up with my podcast yet then you can find it on iTunes here and listen in a variety of ways here as well - I'd love for you to subscribe and it's completely free!

Cathy and I talk about becoming the diamond we're made to be, and Cathy had such great insight I've embedded the episode below so you can listen to it here too!

I really hope you enjoy it, I got so much out of it myself, and as always I'd love to hear your comments!



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Thanks for taking the time to check out my interview with Cathy Madavan. If you've enjoyed it please share it with your friends on social media! Why not subscribe to The Potting Shed Podcast on iTunes for the audio version and much more (direct RSS feed is here).

I'd love to hear from you, so feel free to comment below or email me at stricklandmusings@gmail.com 

If you want to stay up to date please sign up to my mailing list, and do check out my book Life Space on Amazon.

Friday, June 12, 2015

Alignment

Straight-line thinking...
The other week I planted out our potatoes on the allotment, and this year to get them in dead straight rows I ran some twine between pegs at either end and used a tape measure to space the holes and rows out evenly. 

Hopefully this means that as the plants come up they’ll be in perfectly aligned rows, and will impress our fellow plot holders! It’s nice to have things neat and tidy, especially on our allotment – sadly this is less often the case!
"Roman roads are famously dead straight..."
I read a fascinating book recently about the Iron Age map of Europe – essentially the druidic cultures of that time created a sophisticated road network using solar alignments, pre-dating the Roman roads, and in many cases literally forming the literal foundation to later Roman infrastructure. 

Roman roads are famously dead straight, as were the druidic solar roads, and this is certainly true when plotted on a large scale map. But on the ground even Roman roads deviated like a lazy sine wave around local obstructions and features – never more than a few hundred metres or so, but minor deviations from “true”.

So often with the alignment of our life we can find ourselves thinking in straight lines. Perhaps our subconscious desire is for our lives to be orderly and linear, like my row of potatoes or a Roman road. As we all discover, however, our paths are rarely straight and circumstances in all shapes and forms conspire to knock us off course.
"So often with the alignment of our life we can find ourselves thinking in straight lines"
In my Civil Engineering degree and in the early years of my career I spent time learning about road design. With highway design you think in terms of straight lines and curves - normally the curves are transitions between one straight line and another. The radius of the curve depends on the design speed so for faster roads the curves need to be wider. In fact, the best road alignments are marked by the most appropriate curves to fit the terrain - side to side in profile and up and down in long-section. The most efficient designs have just enough curvature to enable a smooth journey whilst minimising costly earthworks.

The same principles apply to buried drainage systems, borrowing another analogy from the world of civil engineering. The best systems have all the incoming branches suitably angled for smooth flow - all aligned in the same direction as travel. 

Surrender to the meanders...
Turning to the environment, the natural alignment of rivers and watercourses is invariably not straight. Yes, in their higher reaches they may be straighter, but a healthy river has wide meanders as it moves downstream. 

No matter how much we try to artificially straighten and contain them, rivers have a knack of bursting their banks and finding their natural alignment again. 

In fact, the meanders help slow the flow, create floodplains and generally result in a richer ecosystem. 

So apart from planting our potatoes or travelling along Roman roads, maybe it's time to ditch our straight-line thinking and surrender to transitions, curves and meanders. Like rivers our natural alignment is more of a meander, and maybe now's the time to allow your banks to burst in a few places to find that width again.
"maybe it's time to ditch our straight-line thinking and surrender to transitions, curves and meanders."


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Thanks for taking the time to read Alignment. If you've enjoyed it please share it with your friends on social media! Why not subscribe to The Potting Shed Podcast on iTunes for the audio version and much more (direct RSS feed is here).

I'd love to hear from you, so feel free to comment below or email me at stricklandmusings@gmail.com 

If you want to stay up to date please sign up to my mailing list, and do check out my book Life Space on Amazon.

Friday, June 05, 2015

Forward Visibility

You can't always see round corners...
This week we've been on a family holiday in Cornwall, which has been a refreshing break for all of us. A characteristic of Cornish roads is that many of them are narrow, winding and have high hedges either side. 

This makes it much harder to see what's coming around the corner, and therefore a more cautious driving approach is needed when travelling on these country lanes. It also means that a "Cornish mile" takes longer to travel than a regular mile, therefore journey times and expectations need to be adjusted accordingly!

Relying on an out of date sat-nav can also lead to mishap, especially when combined with Cornish lanes. We very nearly had a mishap when directed down a turning which swiftly deteriorated into a muddy, potholed, overgrown track - slightly stressful to be honest as we bounced slowly along from pothole to pothole, nervous for our car's suspension! While I gripped the steering wheel tighter and held my breath, my daughter piped up from the back seats saying how much she was enjoying the adventure! I must confess I didn't quite see it the same way until afterwards when, after a mile of "adventure" we rejoined a more navigable road.
"...a "Cornish mile" takes longer to travel than a regular mile.."
Driving in Cornwall has reminded me yet again of the importance of being journey-focused and not merely destination focused. So often we head for the nearest motorway - the wide, fast road - to get to our endpoint as efficiently as we can. And not just when we're in our cars, but metaphorically in our careers, relationships and personal goals as well. I wonder if we have a bias towards the wide and fast routes in our life journeys? Admittedly it can be easier to see what's coming, but our trips become more linear, more functional and potentially less fulfilling.

Of course, in life we can rarely see what's coming our way round the next corner, and more often it's like we're travelling on Cornish country lanes rather than motorways. If you're like me, it's easy to have a "fast road" attitude when travelling on slow routes, leading to frustration and road rage if I'm honest! I'm not saying that fast is bad, just that for this particular life-journey metaphor you need to balance your speed with the visibility ahead. If you're on a proverbial Cornish road then the best thing to do is adjust your speed, enjoy the scenery and allow for extra travel time - otherwise you'll get frustrated.
"Of course, in life we can rarely see what's coming our way round the next corner"
There are two things not to do on a meandering narrow road. Firstly don't drive too fast because you never know when a juggernaut will come flying around the next bend. But secondly, don't drive too slowly - yes slow down for really sharp bends - but in general drive the road at a reasonable pace. Otherwise you'll take far too long to get anywhere and you're likely to hold other people up behind you. The knack is to drive confidently and decisively without driving dangerously. One other lesson that's helpful is about following the tail lights of someone more familiar with the route, let alone reading the signposts - a topic for a whole other post!
"It's not realistic to be able to see the whole road ahead of us"
It's not realistic to be able to see the whole road ahead of us. There are too many twists and turns, ups and downs for that, especially when we're looking to a distant destination. In my own life I've too often been risk-averse in the face of this, driving too slowly and not getting anywhere as a result. This is just as frustrating as trying to find shortcuts and save time - applying a "fast road" attitude to our lives.

So don't worry about not being able to see around the next corner, and don't fret about your journey time - keep on confidently going, and remember that Cornish miles are longer than regular miles! And if you find yourself crawling down a potholed track, take my daughter's advice and realise that it's all part of the adventure!

Wherever you find yourself, these words from the book of Jeremiah are something I find helpful - especially because they were spoken when God's people were in exile. Even when we're in a foreign country, even when life is taking a scenic route: "I know the plans I have for you... plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you a hope and future" (Jer 29:11).

No matter what twists and turns you've faced, there's always hope around the corner. 


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Thanks for taking the time to read Forward Visbility. If you've enjoyed it please share it with your friends on social media! Why not subscribe to The Potting Shed Podcast on iTunes for the audio version and much more (direct RSS feed is here).

I'd love to hear from you, so feel free to comment below or email me at stricklandmusings@gmail.com 

If you want to stay up to date please sign up to my mailing list, and do check out my book Life Space on Amazon.

Saturday, May 30, 2015

Know Your Place

What's your natural habitat?
I've been mulling over the word "place" this week. We use it in lots of different contexts or ways. If something's lost it's misplaced. We may have a favourite place and we each have a birthplace. Things can be in the right place or the wrong place. Many people aspire to a place of their own. There are sacred places and fireplaces.

Working alongside ecologists on a daily basis I've learned a fair bit about invasive species. These are plants or creatures who's natural place is in a different habitat across the world but have, for whatever reason, been brought to the UK and have thrived. 

Japanese knotweed is one, Himalayan balsam is another. We have grey squirrels and american crayfish which have decimated our natural squirrel and crayfish populations. And this isn't a problem just here in the UK. In Florida escaped Burmese pythons have thrived so much in the Everglades that they've resulted in a drastic decline in small mammals and birds. The state now pays people to hunt them.

"Maybe like me there have been times in your life when you've felt out of place"
Maybe like me there have been times in your life when you've felt out of place, like a fish out of water. Out of your natural habitat. For me it's not something I experience all that often I'm relieved to say, although one of my more memorable experiences was attending a pilates class when I was in my twenties. Let's just say that didn't become a regular gym class of mine!

In many ways I think that a key part of life is finding the unique habitat that we thrive in. Learning to know our place. The place where we belong, where our skills, talents and personalities can flourish. And whilst it's important that we don't spend our lives in a place where we can't express ourselves or positively contribute, like a fish out of water, it's equally important that we don't spend our lives dominating an ecosystem like an invasive species, and displacing others.  

An important part of finding the right habitat is understanding what makes you tick. And we all tick in different ways. I love this quote: "Everyone is a genius, but if you judge a fish by it's ability to climb a tree it will live its whole life thinking it is stupid".

"...a key part of life is finding the unique habitat that we thrive in"
Some animals are more adaptable than others, and that's true for us too, but none of us can do everything perfectly. Our challenge is to play to our strengths, to do what we're made for, to find that place where we feel most at home. Often it's important to find other people who call out the best in us, who chime with what we do, who recognise and appreciate our make-up. Finding a wolf pack or whale pod, or hive or tribe. We do better when we're in a place of community. Like a coal we can quickly lose our heat and go cold when we're not surrounded by other burning coals.


A key part of life is finding our place...
When I was 6 or 7 I was very briefly in a chess club at school. It was very brief because I was an inexperienced chess player and in my first game I was beaten in three or four moves - a classic "fools mate". I was very much put in my place by more experienced chess players, which put me off chess somewhat! 

Sometimes though I think we feel like we're stuck in the middle of a bad game of chess, we're not sure where we're supposed to be placed or how on earth we'll make it through to the end of the game. 

Or perhaps we feel more like we're in snakes and ladders, with that success ladder or failure snake tantalisingly close whatever move we make. Whilst I do think we should be more playful in our decision making and approach to life at times, I don't believe we're mere pawns in a cosmic game of chess. Instead I believe in a creator that has uniquely placed us and is keen to guide our steps.
"to know our place in a thriving, flourishing and life-affirming way"
Wherever you find yourself placed right now, whether you feel like a fish out of water or in your element, my prayer for you is that you'll increasingly know your place. Not in a negative "be quiet, sit down, know your place!" way, like being told off as a child, or being humbled by those more experienced than us. Instead, to know our place in a thriving, flourishing and life-affirming way. The habitat, the ecosystem we can fully inhabit and contribute to. That's the place I want to be.

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Thanks for taking the time to read  Know Your Place. If you've enjoyed it please share it with your friends on social media! Why not subscribe to The Potting Shed Podcast on iTunes for the audio version and much more (direct RSS feed is here).

I'd love to hear from you, so feel free to comment below or email me at stricklandmusings@gmail.com 

If you want to stay up to date please sign up to my mailing list, and do check out my book Life Space on Amazon.

Friday, May 22, 2015

I am, I can, I ought, I will

As our kids began to reach school age, like most parents we began the agonising process of considering what the best form of education for them would be. We visited local schools and talked to other parents we knew about their experiences and how their children were getting on at the schools they’d chosen.

Out of left-field came the idea about home educating, and after months researching the legislation, practice, meeting local groups and listening to stories from other home educating families we took the plunge and opted not to take up the school place our daughter had been offered. Instead we threw ourselves wholeheartedly into the world of home education.
"Out of left-field came the idea about home educating..."
There’s a huge spectrum of approaches to Home Ed. Some people purchase and follow comprehensive curricula, whilst at the other end of the spectrum are families who choose a completely unstructured approach. We’re somewhere in the middle, and our educational philosophy is based on the Charlotte Mason approach.

Love this motto from Charlotte Mason
Charlotte Mason was an educator in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. She left a huge body of work behind on her approach, which was very literature based and outdoors focused. Many schools and educators across the world follow her philosophy. As well as very practical aspects about learning styles and practical skills, a key feature of her approach is to help children and young people develop good habits, cultivating curiosity and interest in the world they encounter.

This post’s title is from one of Charlotte Mason’s mottos for her students: “I am, I can, I ought, I will”. The phrase sums up her emphasis on making good choices which come from the inside out, working from a deep level of identity, and focusing on abilities and growth. We like it so much we’ve framed it and put it in our hall!
"...cultivating curiosity and interest..."
As you can imagine, it’s not just children who can benefit from thinking this way. Personally I find it really helpful, as so often I’ve lived or still live my life the other way round. Perhaps the opposite phrase is “I’m Not, I Can’t, I Wish, I Won’t”.

“I’m Not” – so often it’s easy to define ourselves by what we’re not. Especially when we compare ourselves with others. That’s not to say that we can’t be ambitious or want to improve in areas of our lives, but that we can so often focus on the negative rather than accepting ourselves as we are. Embracing our inner buzzard so to speak! As a young singer, for a long time I wished I could sing like Martin Smith or Bono, both of whom have a much higher range than I have. I was so frustrated I couldn’t reach the high notes they could! These days I’ve learnt to embrace and enjoy the vocal range I’ve got, even as I’ve also trained my voice to reach a little higher than I could when I was younger.

“I can’t” – how often do we spend too long focusing on weaknesses rather than our strengths? Or do we talk ourselves out of being able to act when daunted by the size of the issues or tasks we face. Perhaps we overestimatethe shadows and underestimate our abilities. Rather than focusing on what we can’t do, maybe we need to spend more time considering what we can do – breaking our hurdles down into small steps. I find a quote from Francis of Assisi helpful in this respect, especially when facing the weeds on our allotment: “Start by doing what is necessary; then do what’s possible; and suddenly you are doing the impossible.”
"Perhaps the opposite phrase is: 'I’m Not, I Can’t, I Wish, I Won’t'."
Are we stepping closer to our dreams or just wishful thinking?
“I wish” – I’m an advocate of dreaming big, I really am – in fact the subtitle of my book Life Space is “Give your dreams room to grow”. I do feel that many of us need to reconnect with our dreams and passions and make space for them. But we also need to be taking steps towards bringing them into reality in some way – to be awake to them. 

If we’re not taking action then we’re in danger of wishing our lives away. Or perhaps “I wish” is a way we excuse ourselves from taking ownership rather than changing ourselves or adapting to the circumstance: “I wish that circumstance or person would change”. 

We could do with being a bit more heliotropic to our dreams. Rather than wishing and staying static, adjusting our position to follow the sun around.

“I won’t” – like, “I can’t”, often we focus on stopping negative behaviours, like I’ll stop eating this or I’ll stop doing that. And there’s no doubt that this is appropriate at times. If your habits are affecting your health, if you’ve developed addictions to nicotine, drugs, alcohol or food then you do need to have strong “I won’t” element to your thinking. 

During Lent there have been years when I’ve given things up like sweet things (2014), alcohol (2015), books (2013)… but other times when I’ve chosen a more positive approach to give more, or take specific actions each day. 

Rather than defaulting to taking things away from our lives, how about focusing on positive or substitutionary behaviours? I will do this more, I will do that more. Sometimes we need to exercise rather than diet! I love this quote from Steve Maraboli: "Think of what makes you smile, makes you happy... and do more of that stuff".

So let’s ditch the I’m Not, I Can’t, I Wish, I Won’t approach to life in favour of the I Am, I Can, I Ought, I Will approach. Perhaps it’s a motto for you to frame somewhere too! 
"We could do with being a bit more heliotropic to our dreams"
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Thanks for taking the time to read I Am, I Can, I Ought, I Will. If you've enjoyed it please share it with your friends on social media! Why not subscribe to The Potting Shed Podcast on iTunes for the audio version and much more (direct RSS feed is here).

I'd love to hear from you, so feel free to comment below or email me at stricklandmusings@gmail.com 

If you want to stay up to date please sign up to my mailing list, and do check out my book Life Space on Amazon.

Saturday, May 16, 2015

Life Goes On

Time passes differently in Narnia...
In my family we’re big fans of the Narnia series of books by C S Lewis. Over the last year or so my five year old daughter and I have been working through the books at bedtimes, and we’re currently reading the Silver Chair which is the penultimate story in the series.

We love the drama, imagery and methaphor in the books, the simple truths and acute observations. We particularly love the character of Aslan, and my daughter confessed the other day that she’d tried getting into Narnia by climbing into her wardrobe. By all accounts she was pretty disappointed that it didn’t work. I suspect that many of us over the years have done the same thing!
"Life goes on in Narnia very differently to our own world"
A key feature of the stories is that Narnia time is not the same as time in our own world. When Peter, Diggory, Lucy or Eustace return from their adventures in Narnia they find that no time at all has passed since they left. But each time they find themselves in Narnia again time there has passed very differently – sometimes hundreds of years have gone by since their last visit. Life goes on in Narnia very differently to our own world.

Have you ever been so tired that you’ve slept much longer than you realised? It’s only happened to me a few times, mainly when I’m very jet lagged and I’ve woken up late into the day or even the evening! 

Funnily enough as I get older I’m becoming an increasingly early riser. Sure, I think having kids awake at the crack of dawn has something to do with it, but I do find that I’m at my most productive in the morning. If I’ve got a big piece of work to finish in the office I’ve learnt that it’s much more effective for me to go into the office earlier than stay later. I guess it’s a function of my circadian rhythms.

Are we sleepwalking through life?
As a student it was a different story – I stayed up later and got up much later. Sleeping in was the norm rather than the exception. As a result my productivity in the mornings was drastically affected. 

These days I have to hold myself back from mowing the lawn before 8am at the weekends and get frustrated when I can’t get going on my task list first thing – the day marches on, and while our neighbours sleep in I want to be making progress!

As much as life goes on while we sleep, there are times when we sleepwalk our way through life. Going through the motions and not necessarily paying attention to where we’re going. 

In a counter-intuitive way, we can often be so busy with the demands of our work or family that days, weeks, months and years can go by in a blur without us especially paying attention to our direction or to what’s around us. I hear stories of fathers who spend their lives working so hard to provide for their family that without meaning to they miss out on playing a bigger part in family life. Life goes on without them in a way. As Dolly Parton sagely said “Don’t get so busy making a living that you forget to make a life”.
"...there are times when we sleepwalk our way through life"
Rob Parsons puts it a different way in The Sixty Minute Father, saying that we kid ourselves into thinking a slower day is coming. The challenge for all of us is to wake up to the most important things in our lives rather than simply sleepwalk through our usual routines and busyness.

Are you frozen in time?
Every now and then a news story will catch my eye about something that’s been discovered that’s been preserved by ice. For instance in Siberia the other year a 39000 year old woolly mammoth was found remarkably well preserved, right down to hair, skin and muscle. 

Reading a book about climbing expeditions up Mount Everest I discovered that the frozen bodies of missing climbers are often found decades after their disappearance. It’s not quite Narnia but life also goes on while things are frozen in time.

There are times when my habits or thinking have been stuck in the past, somehow frozen to a particular set of circumstances. My most recent example has been what I’ve been clothing myself in for my regular run-commute to the train station. Over the winter I layer up with gloves, hat, coat and long trousers so that I stay warm for the 1.8mile journey to catch my train. This is fine during the winter, but I found myself this year wearing far too many layers as spring has blossomed and temperatures have been distinctly milder. 

Despite my circumstances changing I’ve persisted in my usual routine. Maybe you’ve found this too, until that alarm clock moment when you’ve woken up to the fact that life’s moved on, seasons have changed and you need to take action. Perhaps your dreams have thawed out. Practically speaking I don’t need my coat or gloves in the mornings anymore!
"There are times when my habits or thinking have been stuck in the past, somehow frozen to a particular set of circumstances"
I’m well aware that we all suffer loss, trauma and setback in our life which can leave us frozen and numb in many ways. As we go through the cycle of grief there’s a real tension between “business as usual” and allowing ourselves enough time to process and heal. Life does go on, but sometimes we’ve got to allow ourselves to go on a bit of a detour before we catch up with everyone else. For me, one of the hardest lessons I’ve had to learn is how to keep functioning well following setbacks and disappointments. That can be a slow process if I’m honest, but I think it’s ok and probably even healthy that we have wintry seasons in our lives. Hibernation is an important self-preservation technique for many animals, where life does indeed go on but at a much reduced metabolic rate. Watching a documentary about sharks last week I learnt that the Greenland shark (which lives in the extremely cold seas beneath the Arctic) has such a low metabolic rate that it can live for 200 years.

Whether you’ve been having wonderful adventures in Narnia, whether you’ve been sleepwalking through life, or even if you’ve been in hibernation, is there something you need to wake up to right now? Perhaps you’re still layered up for winter and the season has changed. There could be people, circumstances or opportunities that you need to pay attention to. Life goes on, and the more present we are in the midst of it, the richer life we’ll lead. 
"...is there something you need to wake up to right now?"


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Thanks for taking the time to read Life Goes On. If you've enjoyed it please share it with your friends on social media! Why not subscribe to The Potting Shed Podcast on iTunes for the audio version and much more (direct RSS feed is here).

I'd love to hear from you, so feel free to comment below or email me at stricklandmusings@gmail.com 

If you want to stay up to date please sign up to my mailing list, and do check out my book Life Space on Amazon.